tiramisu

Yet another blog topped with an awful photo. I should do a course or something.

Which is a real shame, because I consider tiramisu one of my absolute star pieces. I’ve made dozens of them, and tweak them every time. It’s creamy, boozy, sweet, light, indulgent, chocolatey…  a real treat. I’ve also done one with Bailey’s mixed into the cream, which makes it a beautiful toffee colour and lends a luxurious note.

There is an angle I’m missing which I’ve yet to get, and it’s the crisp element. Perhaps some crumbled meringue like an Eton mess, or a sugary grit topping, or even something as basic as whizzed-up chocolate / coffee biscuits? I need to try these out.

So this is my standard recipe from which I start. One word of warning: it uses at least 4 bowls, so make sure there’s a few to hand.

Tiramisu:

350ml strong coffee or espresso

5 tablespoons Marsala

Vanilla pod, seeds removed (or 1 teaspoon extract)

3 eggs, separated

50g caster sugar

250g mascarpone

250ml double cream, lightly whipped

1 packet savoiardi or sponge fingers

Chocolate for decoration

  1. Blend the coffee and Marsala and allow to cool.
  2. Mix the vanilla with the egg yolks and half the sugar, then warm over a pan of simmering water until foamy. Remove from the heat and leave to cool.
  3. Mix together the mascarpone and whipped cream and fold in the egg yolks.
  4. In a separate bowl whisk the egg whites with the remaining sugar until stiff and fold into the cream mixture.
  5. Dunk the sponge fingers into the coffee, allowing them to abosrb, then layer into a dish. Add a layer of cream mix, fingers and repeat as desired.
  6. Finish with a layer of cream and top with grated dark chocolate (or if you’re in a rush, a crumbled Flake). Leave in the fridge for two hours, or overnight if you can.
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3 thoughts on “tiramisu

  1. Pingback: diplomatico « grubblog

  2. Ariadov

    Try replacing the Marsala with Amaretto. Also, try this as a semi-freddo. That is, partially freeze it. That is, don’t keep it in the freezer long enough for it to freeze through, but so that it is frozen in part, and in part is still soft and creamy.

    Reply

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